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Monthly Archives: August 2015

F1 DRIVER COACHING VIA RADIO – WHAT IS AND IS NOT ALLOWED IN 2015

As this article shows rules on what information can be relayed from the team to the driver over the radio have been restricted, it actually started last season and has been carried over.

Drivers racing the 2015 season will still be subject to the same radio message restrictions imposed by the FIA last year, with the governing body adding that a “a few more” may be included before the start of the season.

Last year, in response to a belief that information being relayed to drivers by engineers concerning performance was against the spirit of article 20.1 of the Sporting Regulations, which state that “the driver must drive the car alone and unaided”, the FIA contemplated a blanket ban on radio traffic between teams and drivers concerning car and driver performance.

However, following consultation with teams, officials modified their position, saying, at the Singapore Grand Prix, that it would delay restricting car performance messages until this season due to the complexity of introducing the ban at short notice and the potential for differing effects among teams. The FIA issued a revised advisory specifying a range of messages that would no longer be permitted.

According to an FIA spokesman the F1 Strategy Group has now ruled that the current restrictions are sufficient and that race officials will expect teams to continue to respect the technical directive issued in Singapore.

“The Strategy Group, from whom the original request to limit what messages could be delivered to the drivers, now feel that the balance is right by only limiting messages that can be considered driver “coaching”,” said the FIA spokesman. “Therefore, the only messages we will not permit are those listed in TD/041-14 from last year.”

He added, however, that there is still scope for further message types to be prohibited.

“We may add a few to this before the start of the season and re-issue the TD,” he said.

The issue of driver coaching is of particular relevance this year to teams such as Toro Rosso, who are fielding two rookies, including F1’s youngest driver, 17-year-old Max Verstappen.

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Toro Rosso’s Franz Tost was strong opponent of the coaching ban, with the team boss saying last September that the changes contained in the technical directive.

“The changes are absolutely not necessary,” he said during the FIA’s press conference in Singapore.

“All the information the drivers get is also entertainment for the people in front of the TV to hear,” he added.

“For us of course it’s a big disadvantage because the more un-experienced the driver is there’s more information you have to give him.

“For me it’s absolutely nonsense what we are discussing here because in all the other kinds of sports a coach gives some informations, instructions to a football player, for example, on the sideline or wherever.

“This does not mean that the sportsman is not able to do his job, he can do his job, he does do his job, but maybe he can do it in a better way, it’s just a performance improvement. Therefore I don’t understand it.”

Under FIA technical directive TD/041 messages concerning the following are not permitted (either by radio or pit board)

           Driving lines on the circuit.

-           Contact with kerbs.

-           Car set up parameters for specific corners.

-           Comparative or absolute sector time detail of another driver.

-           Speeds in corners compared to another driver.

-           Gear selection compared with another driver.

-           Gear selection in general.

-           Braking points.

-           Rate of braking compared to another driver.

-           Rate of braking or application of brakes in general.

-           Car stability under braking.

-           Throttle application compared to another driver.

-           Throttle application in general.

           Use of DRS compared with another driver.

-           Use of any overtake button.

-           Driving technique in general.

How Do Noise Cancelling Headphones Work

Noise-cancelling headphones are the standard nowadays, ever since Bose first introduced these devices to the industry. Even though we all seem to take them granted and use them abundantly, it’s surprisingly to think about the amount of people who don’t know how these headphones work.

Noise-cancelling headphones are probably much more complex than you think, they are made-up of several components with each one being a crucial element to the working of the device.

Throughout the next few sections we’ll give you an overview of the two different types of noise-cancelling headphones, then go into detail on the components of active noise-cancelling headphones.

Passive Noise-Cancelling

Passive noise-cancelling headphones are the simplest variation. They don’t have any specialist components or circuitry that provide them with noise-cancelling features. Instead, much more emphasis is placed on the design of the actual headphones. In other words, passive noise-cancelling headphones simply block out the noise instead of deflecting it.

The most effective types are closed-back headphones and in-ear canal headphones. Other types such as open-back headphones and earbud headphones still provide some sort of passive noise-cancelling, but not nearly as much as the aforementioned types.

Headphones can cancel out noise passively through their design; the materials that are used in the design are of an insulative native, such as high-density foam. This use of materials is all it takes to block out some sound waves, especially those at a high frequencies. One major downside to this is that the additional material makes the headphones much heavier.

Even though these headphones can be effective, they’re not as great as you might think. Some of the best passive noise-cancelling headphones on the market can block as much as 15 to 20 decibels of sounds, which isn’t always enough. This is why active noise-cancelling headphones are the best devices for those who are using headphones in a professional capacity.

Active Noise-Cancelling

Active noise-cancelling headphones can provide you with all the benefits that passive noise-cancelling headphones can. However, these headphones take it a step further by adding additional features and advanced circuitry.

These headphones don’t just block out external noise, they deflect it. Active noise-cancelling headphones accomplish this by producing sound waves, which mimic the incoming noise, but send it back 180 out of phase. Two identical yet out of phase sound waves will be completely cancelled out.

Throughout the next section we’ll tell you exactly how active noise-cancelling headphones accomplish this.

The Components of Active Noise-Cancelling Headphones

Active noise-cancelling headphones are made-up of four components:

Microphone – a microphone is used to detect the sounds that are coming in from external sources, which can’t be blocked passively.

Advanced circuitry – these devices have advanced circuitry placed in the ear cup. This is connected to the microphone and everything else. The advanced circuitry replicates the incoming sound waves with the help of the microphone, the sound waves are then ready to be duplicated 180 out of phase, with the help of the speaker.

Speaker – active noise-cancelling headphones have a small speaker in the ear cup, which produces the sound waves from the advanced circuitry.

Battery – the advanced circuitry, microphone, and speaker need to be connected to an external energy source — hence the word “active”. The external energy source used is usually a rechargeable battery, which can be recharged through a USB port.

As you can see, all of these components need to be working in harmony together in order to produced the desired results. With these components, active noise-cancelling headphones can block out anywhere from 35 to 40 decibels of sound. This makes them an ideal choice for high-active office environments, airline travel, train travel, and even light construction work.

These headphones are generally produced to an extremely high quality and you will definitely be able to tell the difference between active and passive types. The only real downside to these headphones is that they can be quite expensive, but the price is worth it more often than not.

Summary

Hopefully you now have a much better idea of how noise-cancelling headphones work, both passive and active types. Chances are that the construction of these headphones are actually much more complex than you might have initially thought.

Noise-cancelling headphones can be used for much more than just listening to your music undisturbed whilst commuting to work. These devices are commonly used by racecar drivers, pilots, construction workers, and music producers. They don’t just provide you with a better listening experience, they can be extremely useful for health and safety reasons.